Mobile Technology for Improved Malaria Community Mobilization and Project Supervision

Elana Fiekowsky talks about messaging in IRS campaigns at the 2015 Mini-University.

Elana Fiekowsky talks about messaging in IRS campaigns at the 2015 Mini-University.

The PMI AIRS Project presented its findings on the benefits and challenges of using mobile technology in an IRS campaign at the annual Global Health Mini University on March 2, 2015, at George Washington University. The annual learning forum for Global Health professionals and students highlights evidence-based best practices and state-of-the-art information.

The project delivers large-scale and complex IRS, which involves two essential components:  1) visiting remote villages, by foot, to notify households of the spray campaign, and 2) supervising thousands of temporary staff that collects data on paper forms. These massive spray campaigns requires hiring hundreds of mobilizers to walk long distances to reach residents during work hours and ensuring consistent supervision for effective spray quality.  In 2014, The PMI AIRS Project piloted a mobile phone-based platform to test the improvement of community mobilization and staff supervision.  Mass sensitization with voice and SMS messaging to beneficiaries was tested in three villages in place of the traditional house-to-house outreach in Mali. The project also “digitized” paper-based supervisory tools and provided training and an Android smartphone to a sample of supervisors in IRS districts in Senegal and Angola.

Learn more about the findings here. Mobile Technology for Improved Malaria Community Mobilization and Project Supervision